Archive for November 28th, 2010

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King Kong 2 (MSX) – “End of the Adventure” (Commandcom)

November 28, 2010

Konami seems to have a good track record of releasing two versions of each of their games: one for the Famicom, the other for the MSX. Castlevania/Vampire Killer; Contra; Metal Gear 1 and 2/Snake’s Revenge. And now we have King Kong 2, with the MSX version King Kong 2: Yomigaeru Densetsu (King Kong 2: The Legend Restored). In the Famicom version (Ikari no Megaton Punch), players took the role of King Kong himself in his quest to find his beloved Lady Kong. With Yomigaeru Densetsu, it’s the adventurer Mitchel, also out to find Lady Kong, only this time to give him a blood transfusion. The game even resembles the MSX Metal Gear in terms of graphics and level design. Anyway, this forgotten Konami game recently saw an arrange by Commandcom (aka Jorge Mira Boronat) on OCR.

King Kong 2: Yomigaeru Densetsu – “End of the Adventure” (Commandcom)

While I think the soundtrack to Ikari no Megaton Punch is better, I have to admit that the “Stage 1” theme (arranged here) is an absolutely fantastic, catchy melody and pushes what the MSX could do, and it’s great to see how both soundtracks ended up with such great scores. The thing is, I don’t really like the MSX as much as the Famicom (though admittedly, it does sound a little more ‘Japanese’). The MSX usually doesn’t have quite the same impact as the Famicom, which in the right hands (say Kuniyo Yamashita or Hidenori Maezawa) can create a score much more lively and dynamic, due primarily to the extra channels and grittier sound (though Kuniyo Yamashita composed Vampire Killer with about as much gusto as the Famicom version). Still, Commandcom does an excellent job of really fleshing out the ideas present in the original, with lively piano, an adventuresome march, and wicked drumwork. It presents a grand feel of adventure, thick jungles, wild animals, and (in this case) helpful natives. Commandcom references Indiana Jones and Pirates of the Caribbean in his musical style, all excellent adventure scores. This is truly where the strengths of game music arrangements lie, being able to take an original piece and upgrade it for modern ears. It’s truly an example of how the bamboo model of the original song becomes a fully realized building with more powerful technology.

The original soundtrack was composed by Motoaki FurukawaMetal Gear for MSX and Dracula X: The Rondo of Blood.

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